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Proctor & Gamble pledges to use more recycled resin in plastic packaging

Date: Thu, 16 Oct 2014 | Author: Paul Sanderson

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Major consumer goods manufacturer Proctor & Gamble (P&G) has said it intends to double the amount of recycled resin it uses in plastic packaging by 2020.

On releasing its latest sustainability goals for 2020, the company also wishes to ensure that 90 per cent of its packaging is recyclable or that programmes are place to create the ability to recycle it.

In addition, P&G is working across its supply chain to develop the capability by 2020 to replace top petroleum-derived raw materials with renewable materials as cost and scale permit.

It has also committed to reducing water used in its manufacturing facilities by an added 20 per cent per unit of production on top of the 70 per cent it saved between 2002 and 2012.

P&G executive sponsor of sustainability and group president global baby and feminine & family care Martin Riant said: “We continue to improve the environmental sustainability of our products across all aspects of their lifecycle – from manufacturing, packaging and delivery through consumer use.

“We are reducing the environmental footprint of our products for shoppers, our communities and the company while still delivering the quality and performance people expect from P&G products.”

P&G is guided by 12 environmental sustainability goals towards its vision of 100 per cent renewable energy use, 100 per cent renewable or recycled materials for all products and packaging, and zero consumer and manufacturing waste going to landfill.

Since establishing these goals in 2010, P&G now has 70 zero waste manufacturing sites; energy consumption, water use, CO2 emissions and truck transportation are all down significantly, use of renewable energy and the number of virgin materials certifications are up substantially. 

Category: Manufacturing
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