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Secondary commodity prices edge lower on scrap-ex weekly price report

Date: Fri, 30 Sep 2011 | Author: Paul Sanderson

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Many materials saw small adjustments down in price this week.

Markets are nervous about the global economy, and price falls in the value of primary materials are also having an impact. There is also a week long holiday in China next week. However, on the whole, prices are moving a little lower rather than anything dramatic.

Natural PET moved down to £385 to £420 this week from £400 to £425 last week. This is a reflection of a falling oil price, reduced demand and the fact that the price of cotton is now back below $100. The price of PET is influenced by cotton, as PET is used to create an artificial clothing fibre and when the price of cotton is high, there is more demand for PET as a result.

Mixed bottles scrap-ex grade A were a little lower at £260 to £300 from £265 to £310 a week ago. HDPE milk bottles were slightly changed up at £370 to £415 from £370 to £410 last week.

LDPE 98/2 also saw a narrower spread at £280 to £315 compared to £275 to £315 a week ago.

In paper grades, OCC edged up a little to £122 to £132 from last week’s £120 to £130. News and pams was little changed at £118 to £135 from £118 to £136 a week ago.

Clear glass was unchanged on £16 to £22 while amber increased by £1 at the bottom of the spread to £16 to £20.

Despite falls on the LME, scrap prices fell, but not at the same rate. Dry bright copper is trading at £4,250 to £4,500 down from £4,550 to £4,700 last week. This is despite the price of copper on the LME being £4,472 yesterday.

Lead scrap was down to £1,025 to £1,225 from £1,050 to £1,275 last week.

Ferrous grade OA was lower at £255 to £320 from £260 to £330 a week ago.

Aluminium baled cans fell to £910 to £1,000 from last week’s £925 to £1,025.

scrap-ex weekly price report 29 September

Category: Recycling
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