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Almost 40% more material recycled at 2014 FIFA World Cup than anticipated

Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 | Author: Paul Sanderson

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FIFA has reported that 39% more waste was recycled than previously estimated at the 2014 World Cup in Brazil.

A total of 445 tonnes of material was recycled at all 64 matches of the World Cup compared to the 320 tonnes that had previously been estimated.

However, this was still less than the 1,100 tonnes of non-recyclable waste collected at matches.

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FIFA worked with its partner Coca-Cola and local cooperatives to develop a two-bin system at each of the 12 venues so that recyclable paper, plastic cups, PET bottles, metal and glass were put in one bin and non-recyclable waste in the other bin.

It also made sure that all carbon emissions from the tournament were offset.

This was revealed in the FIFA World Cup Sustainability Report.

FIFA secretary general Jérôme Valcke said: “The FIFA Word Cup is the biggest single-sport competition in the world and an event of this scale inevitably has an impact on society and the environment in the host country.

“As the organisers, we believe it is our responsibility to limit the associated negative effects, while at the same time maximising the huge positive impact it can have. Our first priority, and the basis for any long-term impact, was to make the preparation and staging of the event more sustainable.”

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